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Audi A4 Hillclimb and basic time attack

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Final finish up on a long running project, this includes a full rewire and change of the vehicles operating infrastructure.

Engine Management: Link G4 Extreme

Power Management: ECU Master PMU16

Driver Control Interface: 12 Button ECU Master keypad

Power Master: Cartek

1.8T 20v Turbo, running Supertech valvetrain , Cat Cams, Wossner pistons with low friction skirts, Molnar Rods and all sorts more - billet mains and a full girdle.

Borgwarner 7064 EFR

Currently working though all of the wiring courses and am 80% through the Professional Motorsport wiring course.

More to add soon and I will have plenty of questions ....

Attached Files

Looking good mate!

Nice to see Audi's being built.

Just curious.. What was the reason you went with air/water IC ?

^ Not the builder however I've always subscribed to the argument that you can create a more efficient and compact 'single shot' air to water setup as compared to a standard air to air system after you take into account ducting/air priority et cetera. I like the idea of using them in drag, sprint, time attack situations. Less so for longer than 15 minutes flat out.

Yes having used the water to air IC, they work best for short times.

You should not use it for a track/circuit car.

Hi Guys

I have gone with the water to air as the car is only going to run for sprint style races and the air charge temp is awesome - seldom breaching 20*C usually around 15 and the system will be running water wetter for quicker and more efficient heat transfer.

other than that I just wanted to do something different and this let me keep my charge piping just on 1000mm long.

The AWIC setup is a combination of components that can sing in harmony and be just as effective and efficient as air to air.

I've been running AWIC setups in my last 3 cars for the last 15+ years and I do time attack, circuit and endurance racing. If you're closed loop then yes, short stints it is incredibly effective though you're typically cooling the system down afterwards or draining and refilling.

With an open loop system that has a reservoir, you can have capacity to combat long term thermal heat soak in the syste, but tehre is still more to it than that. If you're running a pump that can stay at a rate of 400-450lph, your lines aren't too small, you have an efficient and large heat exchanger, you can maintain a cooler IAT for longer.

For instance, summers here are 105+ making summer races and track events a brutal situation on cars and drivers. I personally run 2 heat exchangers in my system, one out back before going into the reservoir(under the car), that also has fans on a toggle. 2 pumps, one up front before the exchanger coming out of the intercooler, and one before the reservoir. My reservoir I made to fit in a specific spot and hold 1.75 gallons of very light mix distilled and Motul mo-cool. I drain a gallon and make ice cubes using dry ice before events, if it's very hot, I'll drain and freeze more. My entire system holds just over 3.5 gallons. My last 109* air temp track day last summer I did 1.5 gallons of my coolant ice and ran six 45 minute sessions through out the day, and only put the ice in after the first session. All day i saw just below to just at ambient IAT's. I also have my reservoir wrapped in insulation.

I did this setup because I have a 1.8T 20v in a MK1 Jetta GLi(since 2008) and there isn't a ton of room in that bay for a big air to air setup, let alone big ass intake manifold, better radiator, big turbo and manifold, piping,etc.

It's more cost effective and easier to get a more consistent performance from an A2A setup for 98% of people. but don't shun something you haven't personally tested over an over to get the most out of. Quality or parts/components play a huuugge roll as well. Thankfully, I'm a fabricator and machinist by trade in performance and motorsports(head fabricator at Singer Vehicle Design 2015, 2016,2017,2018) that also helps.