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Difference between two coil type springs

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I have always wondered what each coil type is called. This is the example of the rears, one is the type where coils and shocks form one assembly and used on an older JZA80 toyota supra, the other is something that has been around for ages and I am skeptical about yet still is offered on many new performance cars rears for example the new toyota supra A90.

Which one is superior to the other for faster service in the Pit lane and which one is superior for cost/ complexity/ cornering / compactness/ robustness/ to the other. Do they each have a name for their own type because I cannot find sufficient information online.

Sorry the green coilover kit maybe all for front because they dont look appropriate height for the rears, I couldnt find the right thing in my keywords. Hope your this course has moderate to superior success, all comes down to your courses you offer and the in-depth knowledge in the field.

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Sorry about the delay. The first is a type of coil-over, possibly further designated as a threaded body, where the coil spring is fitted over the damper body and is part of the assembly? The second has the spring and damper separately fitted to the suspension and body and is a simple coil spring suspension.

I found an article by suspension manufacturer, but more knowledge and data is needed.

https://www.shocksurplus.com/pages/shocks-vs-struts-vs-coilovers

Well, just for starters, that site has the very first things wrong.

The spring is actually the shock absorber, it absorbs the shock loads to the suspension in addition to holding the vehicle up.

The dampers dampen the spring oscillations - the 'bounce' if you will - they are NOT the 'shocks', 'shock absorbers', or whatever american misinformative term is used!

There are some good suspension design books available, I'd suggest the British ones where possible, as some american ones get the terms wrong.

Is there such a thing where one suspension design is better round high speed corners than the other is my primary question.

Probably the most important things are the suspension geometry (how it moves), and the tyres.

Coil springs are normally used, especially as 'coil-overs', because they are much easier to fit into the vehicle. There have been instances where leaf springs, longitudinal or transverse, have been reasonably effective but they're heavier, take up much more room, and are much more difficult to adjust for rate or ride height just for starters.

99% of the time, the best option is the coil-over design, whether it's the threaded ride adjuster type or the older fixed type. The damping is easily adjusted, as are the spring rate and ride height.

Separating the spring and damper can sometimes be beneficial as it will allow them to have different wheel rates so effectively enabling the damper to have more control and consistency; dampers work better when their stroke is longer as it results in less cavitation and heating of the oil. You often find this on prototypes and single seaters as it allows for the use of torsion bars and Belleville Washer type springs.

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