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Haltech elite 2500 afr on wideband is slightly different then other bank?

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So one of my afr guages isn't reading the same as the other. I have two arm uego widebands wired up to my haltech elite 2500, and trying tune the car but the banks aren't reading the same afr. I'm not sure if this is ok or what to do. I'm new to tuning thanks!

Hi tuningwizard, welcome to HPA.

What engine are you trying to tune and how much of a variation are you seeing?

it's a 6g74 3.5l twin turbo (76htz). So I'm seeing .6 - .7 difference (afr) at idle. Not sure how to tune around this or what to do I'm new to this. Is this normal to see a different afr per bank like that. ?

I think I found it. You can enable individual cylinder trims in the fuel tab in the main setup. I will trim cylinders 1,3,5 (front bank) equally. To try and equalize Afrs between both banks. It has a table with load and rpm and you input fuel percentage. Just not sure what strategy to use, to accurately make both banks on par with each other.

You should try swapping your sensors and wiring bank to bank and see if the difference stays with the cylinders (if so then tune them), or follows the sensor (if so, then either replace or recalibrate them if possible).

Your saying I should swap the sensors around to see if it's accurate pretty much? I was actually wondering that. I guess I could just unplug the harness and swap them in the back of guages and see.

You've got the right approach, enable individual cylinder corrections and adjust the cylinders in one bank. It's not unusual to see a small variation but on a stock engine this would normally be less than 5%. Anything bigger would be cause for concern as it may indicate a mechanical issue.

As David has suggested, swap the wideband first and make sure the same bank reads rich or lean. This will eliminate any inaccuracy in your actual wideband sensors.