Our VIP Package gets you every single course at 80% off the individual price. For a limited time, save an additional $100 with coupon code 100VIP. Learn more

How to Degree a Cam: Adjusting Camshaft Timing

Watch This Course

$49 USD

-OR-
Or 8 weekly payments of only $6.13 Instant access. Easy checkout. No fees. Learn more
Course Access for Life
60 day money back guarantee

Adjusting Camshaft Timing

01.52

00:00 - Actually adjusting the cam timing is normally not possible with a stock engine as there'll be no provision to make fine adjustments.
00:08 Of course we may be able to adjust the cam timing by a full tooth on either the cam belt or cam chain, but this is going to provide a very coarse adjustment with limited control over the actual cam timing.
00:21 In order to degree a camshaft we're going to need a way of making accurate and small changes to the cam timing and this is normally achieved with a vernier adjustable cam pulley that's used in place of the factory fitted pulley.
00:34 These pulleys typically are a two piece construction where the inner section that is keyed to the camshaft is attached to the outer part of the pulley which is driven by the cam belt or cam chain by a set of locking bolts.
00:48 By loosening off the bolts, the camshaft can then be rotated with respect to the outer section of the cam pulley and hence the cam timing can be adjusted.
00:58 An alternative type of adjustable cam pulley is where the cam gear or pulley hasa series of holes that can be located on a dowel in the end of the camshaft.
01:07 By moving between the various dowel hole locations, the cam timing can be adjusted.
01:13 The downside of this type of cam gear is that the cam gear needs to be physically removed from the camshaft and refitted in order to affect a cam timing change.
01:22 The advantage however is that once the cam gear is fitted, there's no potential for the cam gear to move in operation and have the cam timing alter while the engine's operating.
01:34 This can be a problem with the two piece cam gear design where the locking bolts can potentially slip if they're not correctly tightened.