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Rear traction rod for R32 skyline

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What does the traction rod do?

What will an adjustable traction rod correct on a lower vehicle.

Exactly which "rod" are you asking about?

Hi Basil,

It would help if you could provide a link or photo to what you're talking about. With a suspension like that in the rear of an early Skyline, normally when people use the term "traction rod" it is in reference to the amount of anti-squat the suspension has. Unfortunately, so many people and companies confuse the situation by using the same terminology to describe different parts, so it's best if you can give us a little more info 🙂

See attached diagram and picture.

I can see where the camber and toe are adjusted.

what does that arm(high lighted in the attachment) do?

The closest thing that i can think of is something similar to an arm triangluated 4 link suspension.

What effect does it have when that arm is lengthen or shorten?

Attached Files

If it works, this picture should clarify things ""

It appears to be one of the top links in a multi-link rear suspension, the toe is controlled by a separate linkage. Off hand, not sure what affect changing the length will have on the actual geometry, but it will alter the relative positions of both attachment points on the carrier as it will be moving though a different arc, and this will affect the design's intended movement, possibly improving it if the vehicle is lowered away from the OEM points.

Perhaps someone with experience with the vehicle, or the linkage characteristics can comment - it's a bit beyond me without a lot more investigation.

Hi Basil.

First thing about that link - it's simply one of the required links to properly constrain the upright, just part of the multi-link suspension. The two top arms in Gord's picture form a virtual top A arm. I've sketched in the equivalent A arm that these two arms roughly replicate.