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Surge tank set up with single in tank pump?

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Has anyone ever seen a surge tank set up with a single fuel pump? I could think a gravity feed could work well enough, but what about a system that uses a single in tank fuel pump?

If you're wondering why... Low HP engine, light car, hopefully simpler fuel system.

Is the fuel system a 'dead head', does it use a return, or is a hybrid of the two?

I can see three basic ways of doing this - others may have better suggestions?

a/ have the pump feed a surge/swirl tank with two outlets. A lower one that supplies de-aerated fuel to the engine, and a high mounted, restricted (it just needs a big enough hole to allow the air to bleed out, so 1mm or 1/16" should be enough), return to the fuel tank to bleed off and separated out air/ a small amount of fuel. It may be practical to "T" the fuel return with the return from the fuel rail, if used.

The main issues is the surge/swirl tank will be pressurised, so must be strong, and there needs to be enough pump capacity to ensure the small amount of fuel passing through the bleed doesn't affect the rail pressure at full load.

b/ there are many in-tank pump assemblies which have built in anti-surge pickups, which may be cost effective. The pro's are neatness, packaging, possible overall cost if starting from scratch.

Con's are finding something suitable, possible cost if you already have some components, the tank may need to be modified.

c/ avoid the air being drawn in with the fuel in the first place - while b/, above, helps a lot with this. I have in mind the Holley 'hydramat' which only allows fuel through and blocks air - https://www.holley.com/products/fuel_systems/hydramat/ The pro' is the whole surge/swirl tank issue is taken out of the picture. The con' is they are relatively expensive - but if you're starting from scratch, may be comparable and a lot less work.