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Data Analysis Fundamentals: Step 6: Apply Changes

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Step 6: Apply Changes

03.47

00:00 - Now that we've gone through that logged data in detail, we've got a pretty good understanding of where those differences in the driving are coming from and what parts on track we need to work on the most.
00:10 So the next step is to go through and translate that into driver language.
00:13 Now if you're doing this analysis for yourself, for your own driving, obviously you've got a pretty good in depth understanding of what you need to do differently anyway.
00:20 If you're the engineer and you're working with a driver, you're going to need to translate that depending on their level and experience into what they need to do differently on track.
00:28 So obviously most of those differences that we were looking at, were looking at braking markers and braking intensity.
00:34 So this is where you want to start, you don't want go through, let's say if you've got a 40 metre difference in braking marker, you don't want to get them to go straight away and do 40 metres later down the road, you need to work up to it in steps.
00:45 So maybe work up to it in 5 to 10 metre increments, get them more comfortable, a more confident flow and more speed through that section of the track.
00:52 This is by far the most common thing you'll find the difference between a pro and an amateur is braking points and the ability to flow speed through that middle and last part of the braking phase in order to have the confidence to carry more speed in through the entry and the apex of each corner.
01:09 Now depending on the level of skill and experience of your driver, you don't always want to load them up with maybe the 3 main things.
01:15 If you're working with someone who's relatively new to this, maybe you only want to load them up with one or maybe 2 things.
01:20 You're much better off to go out and work on something in a quality way than trying to do everything at once, trying to fix every single part at once, so a maximum of 3 things.
01:29 If you're not confident about that, just go out and work on the one biggest loss, concentrate on that one biggest braking point.
01:35 If you're doing braking point analysis like this, it's important to pay attention to the markers, so what you've got, whether you've got a mark on the track, whether you've got, it's a crack in the track or a position where the surface changes or whether there's a post on the side or a painted wall, whatever it is, it's really important to have those references and to make use of them when you are moving your braking markers forward.
01:55 If I'm not the one doing the driving and I'm an engineer working with a driver, what I'll usually do after we've gone through and discussed what's happening on track, I've gone through and shown them the data, shown them the video so they've got a visual understanding of what's going on, once they're back in the car and we're ready to go do another run and try and work on those points, I'll usually get them to repeat back to me the points that we've agreed that we're going to work on.
02:15 If find that gives me the confidence that they know what they're going to do and it's also just a little bit of affirmation for them that they understand what they're going to be working on as well.
02:22 Don't be afraid to check in with someone and just say OK let's talk about what we're going to work on for this session once they get back in the car and it's just a bit of a confirmation to make sure everybody's on the same page to make sure you get the most out of all of your testing.
02:34 Once you've agreed what parts of the tracks you're going to work on or the improvements you're looking for, it's time to head back out on track and implement it again.
02:40 You can see how this ends up being a bit of a rinse and repeat cycle.
02:43 Go and do a run, check the data, make an improvement, check the data, make an improvement, check the data over and over again.
02:50 It really is an iterative process.
02:52 One thing I would say when you're working in this way is to keep the runs relatively short, probably, for the average length track you're probably talking about doing a maximum of 5 laps per run, come back and check the data often.
03:03 That means you're going to get the most out of your track time rather than just running out and doing lap after lap after lap after lap and just wasting tyres, wasting fuel, wearing your car out.
03:13 You're much better to go out with a concentrated plan, work on it, come back, check the data, go again.
03:19 Within that 5 laps that includes going out and doing your warm up lap to warm up both the car, the brakes, the transmission, all that stuff and the warm down lap.
03:26 So that's talking about doing roughly 3 flying laps to get what you need done as far as making those improvements to the driving.