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Practical Standalone Tuning: Introduction

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Introduction

01.38

00:00 - Now that you've seen the HPA 10-step process being applied on the dyno to a naturally-aspirated engine, we're going to take a look at how that process may be modified to suit a turbo-charged engine.
00:14 Now, before we move into this, it's important just to reiterate that regardless of whether your engine is naturally aspirated, or turbo charged or super charged, the way the engine responds to both fuel and ignition timing is exactly the same.
00:27 It's just with a turbo charged engine, we're going to be targeting a richer air-fuel ratio under boost, and probably we're going to be using less ignition timing as well, in comparison to a naturally aspirated engine.
00:41 Now, before we move on, I also want to mention that particularly when you're just starting to learn how to tune, a naturally aspirated engine can be a little bit more forgiving.
00:51 This is because a naturally aspirated engine is generally going to produce less specific power than a turbo charged or super charged engine.
01:00 This makes it just a little bit harder to do damage to the engine, and a naturally aspirated engine will generally be more tolerant of a slightly lean air-flow ratio, or even brief periods of detonation occurring.
01:14 The turbo charged engine, on the other hand, will be producing a higher specific power level, and this means that it's less tolerant of any errors in our tuning.