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Marine Application

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I'm assuming in the marine industry with a racing outboard, inboard and even a jet ski application. How would you get a steady state tunning when we don't have brakes ? I'm guessing that will be the only down side and I would have to just master using the DATA Loging Charts? I Still wouldn't be able to get Certain KPAs without testing certain loads

Also While on the water when the motor loses instant load from the prop coming out of the water how would you set the REV limit and set the fuel charts separately to prevent engine damage?

Brakes are just drag. For testing, why don't you just add drag in the form of something adjustable you tow behind you in the water? I'm imagining some kind of tunnel hull that produces more drag the lower in the water it sits. You put a water tank on that and add water to increase drag.

I would imagine that most serious tuning for marine applications is done on an engine dyno.

A hard-cut revlimit can be set in most ECUs. This will generally disable ignition (and/or fuel) until the RPM is below the limit. Setting RPM limits to factory limits would be a good start to prevent engine damage.

I guess that's a great idea but very time consuming, unfortunately. I live on a small island and if I had the ability to take it to a dyno I would, but no one on this island has one.

There are only so many operating conditions when you don't have a gearbox (or if you do have a gearbox, then that is one way to adjust the load). If you just tune those steady state, and notice the trends, I bet you can end up with a good tune.

It will still take a while to do it. Good tunes (from scratch) take time.

Thank you, David, appreciate the answers